‘as he is ‘<br>

Name:#972
Personal ID: 972

‘as he is ‘, 9 letters

Note: first and last space is considered a valid letter

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As You Like It

…if he do not mightily grace himself on thee he will practise against thee by poison entrap thee by some treacherous device and never leave thee till he hath taen thy life by some indirect means or other for i assure thee and almost with tears i speak it there is not one so young and so villainous this day living i speak but brotherly of him but should i anatomize him to thee as he is i must blush and weep and thou must look pale and wonder charles i am heartily glad i came hither to you if he come to morrow ill give him his payment if ever he go alone again ill never wrestle for prize more and so god keep your worship exit oliver farewell good charles now will i stir this gamester i hope i shall see an end of him for my soul yet i know not why …

The Tragedy Of Coriolanus

…ce may during his power go sleep sicinius he cannot temprately transport his honours from where he should begin and end but will lose those he hath won brutus in that theres comfort sicinius doubt not the commoners for whom we stand but they upon their ancient malice will forget with the least cause these his new honours which that he will give them make i as little question as he is proud to dot brutus i heard him swear were he to stand for consul never would he appear i th market place nor on him put the napless vesture of humility nor showing as the manner is his wounds to th people beg their stinking breaths sicinius tis right brutus it was his word o he would miss it rather than carry it but by the suit of the gentry to him and the desire …

The Tragedy Of Coriolanus

…foot being once gangrend is not then respected for what before it was brutus well hear no more pursue him to his house and pluck him thence lest his infection being of catching nature spread further menenius one word more one word this tiger footed rage when it shall find the harm of unscannd swiftness will too late tie leaden pounds tos heels proceed by process lest parties as he is belovd break out and sack great rome with romans brutus if it were so sicinius what do ye talk have we not had a taste of his obedience our aediles smote ourselves resisted come menenius consider this he has been bred i th wars since a could draw a sword and is ill schoold in bolted language meal and bran together he throws without distinction give me leave ill go …

Cymbeline

… old man and two boys posthumus nay do not wonder at it you are made rather to wonder at the things you hear than to work any will you rhyme upont and vent it for a mockry here is one two boys an old man twice a boy a lane preservd the britons was the romans bane lord nay be not angry sir posthumus lack to what end who dares not stand his foe ill be his friend for if hell do as he is made to do i know hell quickly fly my friendship too you have put me into rhyme lord farewell youre angry exit posthumus still going this is a lord o noble misery to be i th field and ask what news of me to day how many would have given their honours to have savd their carcasses took heel to dot and yet died too i in mine own woe charmd could not find death where i…

The Tragedy Of Hamlet Prince Of Denmark

…though it have no tongue will speak with most miraculous organ ill have these players play something like the murther of my father before mine uncle ill observe his looks ill tent him to the quick if he but blench i know my course the spirit that i have seen may be a devil and the devil hath power t assume a pleasing shape yea and perhaps out of my weakness and my melancholy as he is very potent with such spirits abuses me to damn me ill have grounds more relative than this the plays the thing wherein ill catch the conscience of the king exit act iii scene i elsinore a room in the castle enter king queen polonius ophelia rosencrantz guildenstern and lords king and can you by no drift of circumstance get from him why he puts on this confusion gr…

The Tragedy Of Hamlet Prince Of Denmark

…her edge and drive his purpose on to these delights ros we shall my lord exeunt rosencrantz and guildenstern king sweet gertrude leave us too for we have closely sent for hamlet hither that he as twere by accident may here affront ophelia her father and myself lawful espials will so bestow ourselves that seeing unseen we may of their encounter frankly judge and gather by him as he is behavd ift be th affliction of his love or no that thus he suffers for queen i shall obey you and for your part ophelia i do wish that your good beauties be the happy cause of hamlets wildness so shall i hope your virtues will bring him to his wonted way again to both your honours oph madam i wish it may exit queen pol ophelia walk you here gracious so please you w…

The First Part Of King Henry The Fourth

…ly deny if sack and sugar be a fault god help the wicked if to be old and merry be a sin then many an old host that i know is damnd if to be fat be to be hated then pharaohs lean kine are to be loved no my good lord banish peto banish bardolph banish poins but for sweet jack falstaff kind jack falstaff true jack falstaff valiant jack falstaff and therefore more valiant being as he is old jack falstaff banish not him thy harrys company banish not him thy harrys company banish plump jack and banish all the world prince i do i will a knocking heard exeunt hostess francis and bardolph enter bardolph running bard o my lord my lord the sheriff with a most monstrous watch is at the door fal out ye rogue play out the play i have much to say in the beha…

The First Part Of King Henry The Fourth

…d had my pocket pickd this house is turnd bawdy house they pick pockets prince what didst thou lose jack fal wilt thou believe me hal three or four bonds of forty pound apiece and a seal ring of my grandfathers prince a trifle some eightpenny matter host so i told him my lord and i said i heard your grace say so and my lord he speaks most vilely of you like a foul mouthd man as he is and said he would cudgel you prince what he did not host theres neither faith truth nor womanhood in me else fal theres no more faith in thee than in a stewed prune nor no more truth in thee than in a drawn fox and for woman hood maid marian may be the deputys wife of the ward to thee go you thing go host say what thing what thing fal what thing why a thing to than…

Second Part Of King Henry IV

… keep no tell tale to his memory that may repeat and history his los to new remembrance for full well he knows he cannot so precisely weed this land as his misdoubts present occasion his foes are so enrooted with his friends that plucking to unfix an enemy he doth unfasten so and shake a friend so that this land like an offensive wife that hath enragd him on to offer strokes as he is striking holds his infant up and hangs resolvd correction in the arm that was upreard to execution hastings besides the king hath wasted all his rods on late offenders that he now doth lack the very instruments of chastisement so that his power like to a fangless lion may offer but not hold archbishop tis very true and therefore be assurd my good lord marshal if we…

The First Part Of Henry The Sixth

…ace sennet flourish exeunt all but vernon and basset vernon now sir to you that were so hot at sea disgracing of these colours that i wear in honour of my noble lord of york darst thou maintain the former words thou spakst basset yes sir as well as you dare patronage the envious barking of your saucy tongue against my lord the duke of somerset vernon sirrah thy lord i honour as he is basset why what is he as good a man as york vernon hark ye not so in witness take ye that strikes him basset villain thou knowest the law of arms is such that whoso draws a sword tis present death or else this blow should broach thy dearest blood but ill unto his majesty and crave i may have liberty to venge this wrong when thou shalt see ill meet thee to thy cost …

The Second Part Of King Henry The Sixth

…im with occasion this happy day is not itself nor have we won one foot if salisbury be lost richard my noble father three times to day i holp him to his horse three times bestrid him thrice i led him off persuaded him from any further act but still where danger was still there i met him and like rich hangings in a homely house so was his will in his old feeble body but noble as he is look where he comes enter salisbury salisbury now by my sword well hast thou fought to day by th mass so did we all i thank you richard god knows how long it is i have to live and it hath pleasd him that three times to day you have defended me from imminent death well lords we have not got that which we have tis not enough our foes are this time fled being opposite…

The Third Part Of King Henry The Sixth

…rs to this needful war richard twas odds belike when valiant warwick fled oft have i heard his praises in pursuit but neer till now his scandal of retire warwick nor now my scandal richard dost thou hear for thou shalt know this strong right hand of mine can pluck the diadem from faint henrys head and wring the awful sceptre from his fist were he as famous and as bold in war as he is famd for mildness peace and prayer richard i know it well lord warwick blame me not tis love i bear thy glories makes me speak but in this troublous time whats to be done shall we go throw away our coats of steel and wrap our bodies in black mourning gowns numbering our ave maries with our beads or shall we on the helmets of our foes tell our devotion with revengef…

King Henry The Eighth

…but this top proud fellow whom from the flow of gan i name not but from sincere motions by intelligence and proofs as clear as founts in july when we see each grain of gravel i do know to be corrupt and treasonous norfolk say not treasonous buckingham to th king ill sayt and make my vouch as strong as shore of rock attend this holy fox or wolf or both for he is equal ravnous as he is subtle and as prone to mischief as able to performt his mind and place infecting one another yea reciprocally only to show his pomp as well in france as here at home suggests the king our master to this last costly treaty th interview that swallowed so much treasure and like a glass did break i th wrenching norfolk faith and so it did buckingham pray give me favour…

King Henry The Eighth

…and yet with charity he was a man of an unbounded stomach ever ranking himself with princes one that by suggestion tied all the kingdom simony was fair play his own opinion was his law i th presence he would say untruths and be ever double both in his words and meaning he was never but where he meant to ruin pitiful his promises were as he then was mighty but his performance as he is now nothing of his own body he was ill and gave the clergy ill example griffith noble madam mens evil manners live in brass their virtues we write in water may it please your highness to hear me speak his good now katharine yes good griffith i were malicious else griffith this cardinal though from an humble stock undoubtedly was fashiond to much honour from his cra…

Das King John

…show evil what have you lost by losing of this day lewis all days of glory joy and happiness pandulph if you had won it certainly you had no no when fortune means to men most good she looks upon them with a threatning eye tis strange to think how much king john hath lost in this which he accounts so clearly won are not you grievd that arthur is his prisoner lewis as heartily as he is glad he hath him pandulph your mind is all as youthful as your blood now hear me speak with a prophetic spirit for even the breath of what i mean to speak shall blow each dust each straw each little rub out of the path which shall directly lead thy foot to englands throne and therefore mark john hath seizd arthur and it cannot be that whiles warm life plays in that…

The Tragedy Of Julius Caesar

…stand brutus what now lucilius is cassius near lucilius he is at hand and pindarus is come to do you salutation from his master brutus he greets me well your master pindarus in his own change or by ill officers hath given me some worthy cause to wish things done undone but if he be at hand i shall be satisfied pindarus i do not doubt but that my noble master will appear such as he is full of regard and honor brutus he is not doubted a word lucilius how he received you let me be resolved lucilius with courtesy and with respect enough but not with such familiar instances nor with such free and friendly conference as he hath used of old brutus thou hast described a hot friend cooling ever note lucilius when love begins to sicken and decay it useth…

Loves Labours Lost

…e on a flask berowne saint georges half cheek in a brooch dumain ay and in a brooch of lead berowne ay and worn in the cap of a tooth drawer and now forward for we have put thee in countenance holofernes you have put me out of countenance berowne false we have given thee faces holofernes but you have outfacd them all berowne an thou wert a lion we would do so boyet therefore as he is an ass let him go and so adieu sweet jude nay why dost thou stay dumain for the latter end of his name berowne for the ass to the jude give it him jud as away holofernes this is not generous not gentle not humble boyet a light for monsieur judas it grows dark he may stumble holofernes retires princess of france alas poor maccabaeus how hath he been baited enter arm…

The Merry Wives Of Windsor

…isd mrs ford how might we disguise him mrs page alas the day i know not there is no womans gown big enough for him otherwise he might put on a hat a muffler and a kerchief and so escape falstaff good hearts devise something any extremity rather than a mischief mrs ford my maids aunt the fat woman of brainford has a gown above mrs page on my word it will serve him shes as big as he is and theres her thrummd hat and her muffler too run up sir john mrs ford go go sweet sir john mistress page and i will look some linen for your head mrs page quick quick well come dress you straight put on the gown the while exit falstaff mrs ford i would my husband would meet him in this shape he cannot abide the old woman of brainford he swears shes a witch forbad…

King Richard The Second

…or this life be spent king richard how high a pitch his resolution soars thomas of norfolk what sayst thou to this mowbray o let my sovereign turn away his face and bid his ears a little while be deaf till i have told this slander of his blood how god and good men hate so foul a liar king richard mowbray impartial are our eyes and cars were he my brother nay my kingdoms heir as he is but my fathers brothers son now by my sceptres awe i make a vow such neighbour nearness to our sacred blood should nothing privilege him nor partialize the unstooping firmness of my upright soul he is our subject mowbray so art thou free speech and fearless i to thee allow mowbray then bolingbroke as low as to thy heart through the false passage of thy throat thou …

King Richard The Second

…t and by the worth and honour of himself comprising all that may be sworn or said his coming hither hath no further scope than for his lineal royalties and to beg enfranchisement immediate on his knees which on thy royal party granted once his glittering arms he will commend to rust his barbed steeds to stables and his heart to faithful service of your majesty this swears he as he is a prince is just and as i am a gentleman i credit him king richard northumberland say thus the king returns his noble cousin is right welcome hither and all the number of his fair demands shall be accomplishd without contradiction with all the gracious utterance thou hast speak to his gentle hearing kind commends to aumerle we do debase ourselves cousin do we not t…

The Tragedy Of Titus Andronicus

…ll of truth but soft methinks i do digress too much citing my worthless praise o pardon me for when no friends are by men praise themselves marcus now is my turn to speak behold the child pointing to the child in an attendants arms of this was tamora delivered the issue of an irreligious moor chief architect and plotter of these woes the villain is alive in titus house damnd as he is to witness this is true now judge what cause had titus to revenge these wrongs unspeakable past patience or more than any living man could bear now have you heard the truth what say you romans have we done aught amiss show us wherein and from the place where you behold us pleading the poor remainder of andronici will hand in hand all headlong hurl ourselves and on …

Twelfth Night Or What You Will

…f therefore draw for the supportance of his vow he protests he will not hurt you viola aside pray god defend me a little thing would make me tell them how much i lack of a man fabian give ground if you see him furious sir toby come sir andrew theres no remedy the gentleman will for his honours sake have one bout with you he cannot by the duello avoid it but he has promisd me as he is a gentleman and a soldier he will not hurt you come on tot aguecheek pray god he keep his oath they draw enter antonio viola i do assure you tis against my will antonio put up your sword if this young gentleman have done offence i take the fault on me if you offend him i for him defy you sir toby you sir why what are you antonio one sir that for his love dares yet …

The Winters Tale

…draw our throne into a sheep cote all deaths are too few the sharpest too easy clown has the old man eer a son sir do you hear ant like you sir autolycus he has a son who shall be flayd alive then nointed over with honey set on the head of a wasps nest then stand till he be three quarters and a dram dead then recoverd again with aqua vitae or some other hot infusion then raw as he is and in the hottest day prognostication proclaims shall he be set against a brick wall the sun looking with a southward eye upon him where he is to behold him with flies blown to death but what talk we of these traitorly rascals whose miseries are to be smild at their offences being so capital tell me for you seem to be honest plain men what you have to the king bei…